Terri MacDonald

Terri MacDonald

Terri MacDonald -- BC Regional Innovation Chair in Rural Economic Development

Terri MacDonald is the BC Regional Innovation Chair in Rural Economic Development and also leads the Columbia Basin Rural Development Institute at Selkirk College. Terri holds a Ph.D. in Educational Studies from the University of British Columbia, and M.A. in Policy and Administration from the University of Calgary, and a B.Sc. and B.Ed. from Lakehead University. Dr. MacDonald taught high school science in Ontario and British Columbia.

Growing, shrinking, and aging – Columbia Basin-Boundary regional population update

Growing, Shrinking, and Aging

Demographic information is critical for local planning. This information can help us understand who makes up our population and what their needs are. As Statistics Canada releases more information from the 2016 Census, the RDI will be able to provide new updates, starting with an Update on Population Numbers. This update presents and compares numbers from BC Stats and Statistics Canada, and discusses why and how the two differ.

RDI Products
Wed, 02/22/2017 - 05:04
0 comments

The Theory, Practice and Potential of Regional Development: Key Learnings & Policy Recommendations

Canadian regional development today involves multiple actors operating within nested scales from local to national and even international levels. Recent approaches to making sense of this complexity have drawn on concepts such as multi-level governance, relational assets, integration, innovation, and learning regions.

Climate Adapatation

Columbia Basin Rural Development Institute selected to help nine municipalities adapt to the impacts of climate change

May 17, 2019 – Columbia Basin Rural Development Institute (RDI) at Selkirk College is proud to announce it will be working with nine municipalities in the Kootenay and Boundary region in their efforts to strengthen their resilience to the effects of climate change.

Fri, 05/17/2019 - 13:25
0 comments
Hydrological Recovery Researcher Kim Green

Nelson researcher examines effects of forest cutting on water flow

After a forest stand has been logged or burned, how long does it take to hydrologically recover? In other words, when will snow accumulation and snow melt get back to the normal condition that would be found in a mature stand of timber?

Hydrology researcher Kim Green is attempting to answer that question in a forest near Blewett, assisted by Selkirk College students and specialized equipment.

“Forests intercept snow and as soon as you get rid of those forests, the dynamics, the energy, all changes, and you end up with more water coming into the system,” she says.

Wed, 04/24/2019 - 10:09
0 comments

Polycentric Governance in Climate Change Policies

The impacts of climate change are more evident everywhere. Rural people who depend on climate-sensitive resources (e.g. water supplies, farming land) are among the more vulnerable population affected by climate events such as heat waves, heavy precipitation, long droughts and intense hurricanes which have been more frequent around the world. Polycentric governance is a form of decision-making that involves multiple levels of authority and multiple sectors representatives under a shared system of rules to regulate their relationships.

Weaving Indigenous Wellbeing, Research, and Ethics: Community and Campus Perspectives in Canada

Presented by CFICE and Community-Campus Engage Canada, in collaboration with the National Association of Friendship Centres, the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network, and the Centre for the Study of Educational Leadership and Policy (CSELP), this webinar explores answers to the guiding question How do we grow impactful Indigenous-Campus engagement and ethical research in Canada t